Month: April 2020

Forces of nature

The concept of a business ecosystem was first articulated by the strategist James F. Moore in his seminal 1993 Harvard Business Review article, “Predators and Prey: A New Ecology of Competition,” and the idea has since gained substantial currency. A business ecosystem is a community of enterprises and related organizations that coevolve over time and align themselves with directions set by one or more central companies. Examples of business ecosystems include a computer company and its users, investors, and third-party app developers; or an energy company with its network of suppliers, customers, traders, and resellers; or an auto manufacturer and the suppliers, retailers, and marketers that surround it.

The ecological analogy is apt because it emphasizes the fact that ecosystem members may both cooperate and compete with one another in complex ways that lead the entire community of enterprises to thrive. But there’s a key difference between biological

Read more

Forces of nature

The concept of a business ecosystem was first articulated by the strategist James F. Moore in his seminal 1993 Harvard Business Review article, “Predators and Prey: A New Ecology of Competition,” and the idea has since gained substantial currency. A business ecosystem is a community of enterprises and related organizations that coevolve over time and align themselves with directions set by one or more central companies. Examples of business ecosystems include a computer company and its users, investors, and third-party app developers; or an energy company with its network of suppliers, customers, traders, and resellers; or an auto manufacturer and the suppliers, retailers, and marketers that surround it.

The ecological analogy is apt because it emphasizes the fact that ecosystem members may both cooperate and compete with one another in complex ways that lead the entire community of enterprises to thrive. But there’s a key difference between biological

Read more

Free Webinar | June 15: Franchise Bible: Leadership Development

Franchise Bible author Rick Grossmann discusses new ways franchisors and franchise owners are adapting to get their leaders ready for the future business climate.


1 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Rick Grossmann will focus on leadership development and new ways franchisors and franchise owners are adapting to get their leaders ready for the future business climate. We will identify franchise industry best practices and our Franchise Bible Coach proprietary strategies to help you get your leadership development plan in place to thrive in the post pandemic world. 

Register Now

Rick Grossmann has been involved in the franchise industry since 1994. He franchised his first company and grew it to 49 location in 19 states during the mid to late 1990s. He served as the Chief Executive Officer and primary trainer focusing on franchise owner relations and creating tools and technologies to increase

Read more

Revealing leaders’ blind spots

Senior executives, accustomed to annual performance reviews and 360-degree assessments, can be quick to acknowledge that certain aspects of their leadership style need more work. These might include having better time management skills, being more empathetic with coworkers, or focusing more on their team. The reviews represent an exercise in self-awareness that most leaders perform believing they can accurately figure out the areas in which they need to improve.

But what happens when you ask the members of their team what they think the boss should work on to be a more effective leader? The results are both unexpected and revelatory, and have implications not only for a leader’s performance but also for that of his or her company.

Consider the example of Stephen (not his real name), the CEO of a 100-year-old organization that is navigating a fundamental shift in its business model. A dynamic speaker who radiates authenticity

Read more

Revealing leaders’ blind spots

Senior executives, accustomed to annual performance reviews and 360-degree assessments, can be quick to acknowledge that certain aspects of their leadership style need more work. These might include having better time management skills, being more empathetic with coworkers, or focusing more on their team. The reviews represent an exercise in self-awareness that most leaders perform believing they can accurately figure out the areas in which they need to improve.

But what happens when you ask the members of their team what they think the boss should work on to be a more effective leader? The results are both unexpected and revelatory, and have implications not only for a leader’s performance but also for that of his or her company.

Consider the example of Stephen (not his real name), the CEO of a 100-year-old organization that is navigating a fundamental shift in its business model. A dynamic speaker who radiates authenticity

Read more

3 Ways Strong Leaders Can Support Work-From-Home Employees

These are the keys to successfully managing a staff that is working from home and keeping its social distance.


4 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Though remote work has risen steadily in recent years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, full-time work from home is still a surprisingly new concept for more than two-thirds of Americans. And managing a staff virtually calls for a modified mindset, perhaps more than many leaders understand or appreciate, especially during a global pandemic.

Here are three ways leaders can emotionally support employees during this difficult time.

1. Exhibit empathy

Your organization’s people are its most valuable resource. 

Some employees are juggling endless distractions. School is closed. Parents struggle to hold down jobs and perform as homeschool teachers — simultaneously! No more school lunches mean kids need to be fed, the fridge needs to be stocked,

Read more