Day: October 12, 2020

No matter who wins, the US is condemned to eternal debt (and Mexico will not escape its effects)


6 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

Whoever wins the next presidential election in the United States will not be able to avoid a policy of growing debt, but will encourage it. It would have already laid the foundations for the next great global financial and economic crisis , when we are still in the first stage of the crisis that generated the Covid-19 pandemic

Thinking in that long term might be idle, but it is not. The Budget Office of the United States Congress (CBO for its acronym in English) has just issued a projection on the country’s public debt for the year 2050; The conclusion is terrible for the US economy because it seems to be condemned to a constant indebtedness

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The lasting impact of 2020 on leadership

There are still a few months left in the year, and given what has happened in 2020 so far, there’s probably still time for yet another seismic event. Already, we’ve had two: the global pandemic and the killing of George Floyd, which heightened awareness of systemic racial injustice, led to protests across the world, and spurred pledges and commitments to change from hundreds of companies.

These events are fundamentally changing the way senior executives act and lead. They have made it safe, even necessary, for leaders to be comfortable saying the words “I don’t know” and “I’m not sure.” But they also have shown the need for more listening and flexible thinking.

Leaders who believe they have all the answers to navigating the tectonic shifts and disruptions caused by the pandemic will quickly lose credibility with their team. “The days of macho leaders are absolutely over,” said Tanuj Kapilashrami, group

Read more

The lasting impact of 2020 on leadership

There are still a few months left in the year, and given what has happened in 2020 so far, there’s probably still time for yet another seismic event. Already, we’ve had two: the global pandemic and the killing of George Floyd, which heightened awareness of systemic racial injustice, led to protests across the world, and spurred pledges and commitments to change from hundreds of companies.

These events are fundamentally changing the way senior executives act and lead. They have made it safe, even necessary, for leaders to be comfortable saying the words “I don’t know” and “I’m not sure.” But they also have shown the need for more listening and flexible thinking.

Leaders who believe they have all the answers to navigating the tectonic shifts and disruptions caused by the pandemic will quickly lose credibility with their team. “The days of macho leaders are absolutely over,” said Tanuj Kapilashrami, group

Read more