Day: June 8, 2020

Deals will reshape industries in the time of COVID-19

Relationships matter, which is why the deals world revolves as much around chance conversations as it does scheduled meetings and planned strategic maneuvers. COVID-19 has changed those serendipitous encounters and the get-togethers that help dealmakers build trust. That said, the dealmaking machinery is far from idle. Despite a lack of physical meetings, deals are still going ahead. Ten-hour videoconferences aren’t unusual. Site visits are a challenge, but drone technology presents a reasonable solution. Cosmetics firm Coty, which was looking for buyers, said it was considering the use of drones for due diligence; in May 2020, it sold its Wella and Clairol brands to U.S. investment giant KKR in a deal worth US$4.3 billon.

The strategic rationale for seeking a deal hasn’t changed and everything companies have always needed to complete a transaction is still in place, but the priorities have changed.  As businesses emerge from lockdowns due to COVID-19

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Deals will reshape industries in the time of COVID-19

Relationships matter, which is why the deals world revolves as much around chance conversations as it does scheduled meetings and planned strategic maneuvers. COVID-19 has changed those serendipitous encounters and the get-togethers that help dealmakers build trust. That said, the dealmaking machinery is far from idle. Despite a lack of physical meetings, deals are still going ahead. Ten-hour videoconferences aren’t unusual. Site visits are a challenge, but drone technology presents a reasonable solution. Cosmetics firm Coty, which was looking for buyers, said it was considering the use of drones for due diligence; in May 2020, it sold its Wella and Clairol brands to U.S. investment giant KKR in a deal worth US$4.3 billon.

The strategic rationale for seeking a deal hasn’t changed and everything companies have always needed to complete a transaction is still in place, but the priorities have changed.  As businesses emerge from lockdowns due to COVID-19

Read more

Sports, health, and cash flow: A delicate balance ahead

The coronavirus pandemic has driven professional sports into crisis management mode. As fans have been forced by the lockdown to question their relationship with sports, so too have some sporting leaders started reevaluating their business models to manage costs and keep those fans engaged.

In some cases, change was already on the horizon: Tennis authorities, for example, had been exploring the idea of merging the men’s and women’s tours; the pandemic is now speeding up those plans in an effort by the tours to streamline costs. Professional golf also wants to reduce expenses for hosting tournaments. But soccer clubs were never expecting to play behind closed doors, as the German Bundesliga is now doing and the English Premier League may do in June.

For other, less established sports, this is a moment of opportunity: E-sports has suffered from canceled live events and competitions, and its projected revenues are

Read more

Sports, health, and cash flow: A delicate balance ahead

The coronavirus pandemic has driven professional sports into crisis management mode. As fans have been forced by the lockdown to question their relationship with sports, so too have some sporting leaders started reevaluating their business models to manage costs and keep those fans engaged.

In some cases, change was already on the horizon: Tennis authorities, for example, had been exploring the idea of merging the men’s and women’s tours; the pandemic is now speeding up those plans in an effort by the tours to streamline costs. Professional golf also wants to reduce expenses for hosting tournaments. But soccer clubs were never expecting to play behind closed doors, as the German Bundesliga is now doing and the English Premier League may do in June.

For other, less established sports, this is a moment of opportunity: E-sports has suffered from canceled live events and competitions, and its projected revenues are

Read more

4 Tips for Starting a Business in an Economic Downturn


7 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


COVID-19 has forced millions of companies to reassess their , but what about the businesses that are still just ideas in the minds of aspiring entrepreneurs? As mass layoffs and desperate bailouts dominate the news, few people are talking about what it’s like to launch a business in the current climate. 

But like other crises throughout history, the coming will create genuine opportunities for founders. As Michael Loeb, founder and CEO of Loeb.nyc, said, “Moments like these are like forest fires. The blaze will cripple some businesses, but they will also provide the heat to release new seeds into the soil. Many amazing companies have been born from the ashes of economic downturns and market crashes.”

The 2008 housing and financial crash saw people in the U.S. seeking affordable accommodation without long-term

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