Top 3 Reasons Why You Should Invest in Business Software Now

Many companies are cutting costs right now, but adding more tech to your operations can help your bottom line.

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The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development () has forecasted that global growth will contract by 6 percent to 7.6 percent in 2020, and it could take years to return to pre-crisis growth levels. Many businesses have instituted blanket spending moratoriums, frozen hiring and deemed most new purchases non-essential. However, some understand that opportunities exist to optimize business efficiency, capture more , and cost-effectively invest in critical infrastructure. HBR suggests playing offense and defense by first stabilizing your business and ensuring liquidity, and then determining how to outmaneuver your competition. 

The current business environment has caused

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How to create a “new normal”

Note: This column is the third in a series about redefining experiences in this time of great change and isolation, and reimagining them to emphasize the importance of human connection. The first can be found here and second here.

COVID-19 has swept through workplaces like a hurricane, scattering employees in every direction, exposing many to new risks, and redefining what workers need to do their jobs safely, efficiently, and effectively. At the same time, customers’ needs and expectations have changed drastically, too. As interactions have moved online and economic pressure has made revenue a matter of brand survival, the touch points where the customer journey and employee journey intersect — moments when a brand can create (or lose) value — have become even more critical than they already were, both in ways that can easily be counted, such as revenue, and in ways that cannot, such as emotional

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What YouTube’s Famebit Failure Can Teach Us About Influencer Marketing

Why YouTube shuttered its self-service influencer marketing platform.


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It would be great if working with influencers was like hiring someone on Fiverr. Give them the money, they do their magic, and voila — campaign success! 

But, as Warren Buffett said, “You can’t produce a baby in one month by getting nine women pregnant.” 

It’s a hard lesson to learn. One that YouTube has learned for themselves. Three years after acquiring Famebit, the self-service platform, they’re shutting it down. That platform allowed brands to submit campaign opportunities for as little as $100. Influencers would opt into campaigns, and brands would select the ones they liked

The dream was automation of the influencer marketing process.  

Why did that dream die?

YouTube alludes to the answer in their closure announcement. They’ve “learned a lot about

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Free Webinar | July 21: The Recipe for Successful Leadership in a Rapidly Changing Market

Join us as we sit down with Linda Findley Kozlowski, CEO of Blue Apron, to discuss the challenges and opportunities for entrepreneurs in today’s landscape.

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2 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Businesses have either suffered or soared during the pandemic. If you want to hear from the CEO of a that has thrived to become one of the most in-demand services during quarantine, mark your calendars. This C-suite leadership series is hosted by Comparably co-founder/CEO as he sits down for a virtual fireside chat with Linda Findley Kozlowski, CEO of Blue Apron (: APRN) — the pioneer in healthy meal prep delivery service. The conversation will center around practical “If I Knew Then…” leadership advice, personal life philosophies and guiding principles, and the

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Creating the right kind of urgency to bring about change

Illustration by Peter Stark

When disruption strikes a business, it is natural for its leaders to try to defend it by focusing on core business activities and improving current products and practices, even while creating a sense of urgency to bring about change. In a survey of 486 global CEOs PwC undertook in 2019, a significant majority said this was a good response to disruptive new entrants.

On the face of it, this reaction appears to be a no-brainer. And there are numerous examples of companies whose defense succeeded. Take Sky, a European media and entertainment company that responded to disruption by digitizing its existing processes and at the same time developing new digital products for its customers — all of which aimed to improve Sky’s core business. Similarly, Walmart invested heavily in robotics to improve the efficiency of its retailing operations while also leveraging its 4,789 physical stores in

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